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It's tech warfare in college football today

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As head coach of one of the country's top football programs, University of Georgia's Mark Richt oversees an enterprise with the latest and greatest in technology: iPads and iPhones by the bushel, Mac Pros for video review, sophisticated software and a …

Cyberattacks 2012 (April 23, 2013 8:17 PDT) …item 2.. New class of industrial-scale super-phishing emails (4th March 2013 09:31 GMT) …item 3b.. WarGames – WOPR — ‘CPE1704TKS’ (1983) …
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"In many ways, DDoS has become the weapon of choice for multiple types of attackers, from political activists to criminals, and potentially even nation-states," Akamai said.
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……item 1)…. Cyberattacks triple in 2012, Akamai says …

… CNET News … news.cnet.com/

China remains the largest culprit, with 41 percent of fourth-quarter observed attack traffic originating in the country, up from 33 percent in the third quarter.
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img code photo … Cyberattacks 2012

asset0.cbsistatic.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2013/04/23/Akamai_610…

Akamai’s state of the Internet report found that distributed denial of service attacks tripled in 2012.
(Credit: Akamai)
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by Shara Tibken April 23, 2013 8:17 AM PDT

news.cnet.com/8301-1009_3-57580920-83/cyberattacks-triple…

Cyberwarfare incidences jumped sharply in 2012, Akamai said, with the number of distributed denial of service attacks more than tripling from the previous year.

Akamai, one of the world’s largest globally distributed networks, said its customers reported being targeted by 768 DDoS attacks last year, more than three times as many as in 2011. The company’s State of the Internet report released Tuesday also found that more than a third of those attacks targeted the commerce sector, while another 20 percent targeted enterprise customers.

Related stories:

… Akamai: A third of cyberattacks come from China
… Which states have the best broadband?
… How the Spamhaus DDoS attack could have been prevented

"In many ways, DDoS has become the weapon of choice for multiple types of attackers, from political activists to criminals, and potentially even nation-states," Akamai said.

Akamai noted that, at this point in time, it’s only counting attacks that were serious enough to require human interaction to combat them. Lower-level attacks, which are mitigated automatically with little or no interaction from Akamai or its customers, are not included in the total.

China remained the largest culprit of cyberattacks, Akamai said. In the fourth quarter alone, 41 percent of observed attack traffic originated in that country, up from 33 percent in the third quarter. The share of attacks from the U.S. slid slightly to 10 percent in the fourth quarter from 13 percent in the third quarter.

"Looking at the full year, China has clearly had the most variability (and growth) across the top countries/regions, originating approximately 16 [percent] of observed attack traffic during the first half of 2012, doubling into the third quarter, and growing further in the fourth quarter," Akamai said.

The company noted it doesn’t have enough insight to explain why the number of Chinese attacks soared so much.
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img code photo … Most cyberattacks come from China.

asset2.cbsistatic.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2013/04/23/Attack_tra…

Most cyberattacks come from China.
(Credit: Akamai)

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Meanwhile, Akamai also found that nearly 700 million unique IP addresses connected to its network in the fourth quarter, up 2.4 percent sequentially.

It also discovered that the global average connection speed increased 5 percent sequentially to 2.9 Mbps, and the global average peak connection speed grew 4.6 percent to 16.6 Mbps. Year-over-year, the peak speed jumped 35 percent.

The increase came even as more people accessed the Web through mobile devices. Akamai noted that mobile data traffic doubled from the fourth quarter of 2011 to the fourth quarter of 2012, and grew 28 percent between the third and fourth quarter of 2012.

Topics:Cybercrime, Security, Corporate and legal, Vulnerabilities and attacks Tags:Akamai, cyberattack, China, DDoS
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About Shara Tibken

Shara Tibken is a senior writer for CNET focused on Samsung and other consumer tech news. She previously wrote for Dow Jones Newswires and the Wall Street Journal. She’s a native Midwesterner who still prefers "pop" over "soda."

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…..item 2)…. New class of industrial-scale super-phishing emails threatens biz …

… The Register … www.theregister.co.uk/

Bulk messages are highly targeted and able to slip past defences

By John Leyden • Get more from this author

Posted in Security, 4th March 2013 09:31 GMT
Free whitepaper – Hands on with Hyper-V 3.0 and virtual machine movement

www.theregister.co.uk/2013/03/04/longlining_phishing/

Security watchers are warning of a surge of highly convincing spear-phishing emails sent in bulk.

More than one in 10 recipients of these so-called longlining* messages click on links to compromised websites because the phishing email look utterly plausible, according to cloud-based security services firm Proofpoint.

The combination of tailored emails and mass volume means that cyber-criminals can cost-effectively send 10,000 or even 100,000 individual spear-phishing messages, all potentially capable of bypassing traditional security defences. This approach greatly improves odds of success and the ability to exploit zero-day security vulnerabilities in victims’ PCs, Proofpoint warns.

Unlike conventional mass-mailing phishing lures, the ‘hooks’ (email messages) are highly variable rather than all identical. The body content also includes multiple mutations of an embedded URL, which points to an innocuous website to begin with but is then booby-trapped some time after the email is sent. Attackers can distribute thousands of email-borne malicious URL ‘hooks’ in a matter of hours, according to Proofpoint.

The company said that it has observed, documented and countered dozens of longlining attacks globally over the last six months. Victims are lured into visiting "drive-by downloads" websites that typically exploit browser, PDF and Java security vulnerabilities to install "rootkits" on vulnerable PCs.

No user action is required beyond clicking on the emailed URL and visiting a malicious website. In many cases system compromises were triggered when employees accessed corporate email accounts from home or on the road and sometimes using mobile devices.

One wave originating from Russia last October included 135,000 emails sent to more than 80 companies in a three-hour period. To avoid detection, the attacker used approximately 28,000 different IP addresses for its sending agents, 35,000 different ‘sender’ aliases, and more than twenty legitimate websites compromised to host drive-by downloads and zero-day-exploiting malware.

Because of the different agents, sender aliases, URLs, subject lines and body content, no single targeted organisation saw more than three emails with the same characteristics. All these characteristics meant the attack would fail to register as anything more than background noise and stood an excellent chance of making it past traditional signature and reputation-based anti-spam defences and secure gateway appliances as a result.

In another attack, approximately 28,800 messages were sent in multiple one-hour bursts to more than 200 enterprises. The campaign consisted of 813 unique compromised URLs sent from 2,181 different sending IPs. Again, each organization saw no more than three messages with identical content.

By using a distributed cloud of previously compromised machines and process automation to create high variance, attackers have been able to combine the stealth techniques and malicious payloads of spear-phishing with massively parallel delivery.

"With longlining, cyber-criminals are combining the stealth and effectiveness of spear phishing with the speed and scale of traditional phishing and virus attacks," said David Knight, executive vice president of product management for Proofpoint.

Proofpoint has published a whitepaper on longline phishing attacks which can be found here (registration required). ®

— Bootnote

* Longlining is named after the industrial fishing practice of deploying miles-long fishing lines with thousands of individual hooks.

Free whitepaper – Hands on with Hyper-V 3.0 and virtual machine movement

READ MORE Phishing Email Security Proofpoint

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…..item 3a)… WarGames … From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia …

This article is about the 1983 film. For the 2001 film, see War Game (film). For other uses, see War Game (disambiguation).

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WarGames

WarGames is a 1983 American Cold War science-fiction film written by Lawrence Lasker and Walter F. Parkes and directed by John Badham. The film stars Matthew Broderick, Dabney Coleman, John Wood, and Ally Sheedy.

The film follows David Lightman (Broderick), a young hacker who unwittingly accesses WOPR, a United States military supercomputer programmed to predict possible outcomes of nuclear war. Lightman gets WOPR to run a nuclear war simulation, originally believing it to be a computer game. The simulation causes a national nuclear missile scare and nearly starts World War III.

The film was a box office success, costing US million, and grossing ,567,667 after five months in the United States and Canada. The film was nominated for three Academy Awards. A sequel, WarGames: The Dead Code, was released direct to DVD on July 29, 2008.

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…..item 3b)…. youtube video … That scene from War Games … 4:06 minutes

Launch Code CPE1704TKS

Strategy: India Pakistan War – Winner: None
Strategy: Mediterranean War – Winner: None

Greeting Professor Falken …
Hello …
A Strange Game. … The Only Winning Move Is Not To Play. …
How About A Nice Game Of Chess? …

www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHWjlCaIrQo

Greg Granito

Uploaded on Feb 16, 2007
This is the "lesson" scene from the movie War Games. Where we learn that the only way to win in Nuclear War is not to play.

www.miabifilms.com

Category
Film & Animation

License
Standard YouTube License
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WOPR

WOPR (pronounced "Whopper") is a fictional military supercomputer featured in the movie WarGames and its sequel. It is an acronym for War Operation Plan Response. Director John Badham invented the name "WOPR" when he thought the NORAD SIOP (Single Integrated Operational Plan) was "boring, and told you nothing". "WOPR" according to the director plays off of the Whopper hamburger and a fuzzy image of something going whop.

— Purpose

W.O.P.R. is a form of artificial intelligence, programmed to play numerous strategy and war games, including one called Global Thermonuclear War, the purpose being to enable itself to optimally respond to any possible enemy nuclear attack. Unbeknownst to its military users, W.O.P.R. was programmed with a level of sentience by its inventor, and when prompted it responds to the name Joshua, the name of its creator’s deceased son.

In the 2008 direct-to-video sequel WarGames: The Dead Code W.O.P.R. was retired and replaced with R.I.P.L.E.Y., a new artificial intelligence supercomputer. W.O.P.R. was used to run a hydroelectric dam in Canada but R.I.P.L.E.Y. sent an unmanned predator drone to destroy the old W.O.P.R..

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Virginia Tech running back Trey Edmunds is used to great expectations

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BLACKSBURG, Va. — Trey Edmunds walked into a Virginia Tech athletics office last week, about to fulfill his latest interview request, when someone brought up his father. Turns out one of the school's employees knew Ferrell Edmunds in high school and …

So I Have Some Tech News…
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Hey, Kids! You may have noticed a marked increase in my blogging lately. I have actually been blogging part-time (though it feels like full-time (EDIT: in a good way!) ) for a site called Netbook News . I actually started on the day Steve Jobs announced his resignation, so my first story about an un … Posted via email from Jezlyn Jones

Tech News Today – DHP – 6.9.10
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Last week I appeared on Tech News Today twit.tv/tnt7 with Tom Merritt and Becky Worley to discuss the 2010 New York Internet Week.

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