Design

New Chipworks data sheds light on Apple’s iPad Pro processor design

When Apple launched its new iPad Pro, it tossed the industry a bit of a curveball. The iPad Air 2 had used a triple-core CPU rather than Apple’s traditional dual-core, and many expected that the manufacturer would continue this with the iPad Pro, assuming it didn’t move to a quad-core. Instead, Apple stuck with a dual-core design but clocked it higher, with a 22% boost to clock speed. Chipworks has put the new SoC under their microscope and come away…

Hardware

How the iPad Pro Can Get Millennials Hooked on iOS

Windows and Mac OS X have been my operating systems of choice for years, while iOS and Android have been supplemental OSes for smartphones and tablets. But I believe there is a changing of the "OS" guard happening as younger tech users move into the business world. Some of this younger generation use PCs, even though most use Macs. However, much of their time is spent on phones and tablets for personal and productivity projects, particularly iPhones. I believe Apple…

Technology

the new Apple iPad Pro could kill the PC

Five years ago, Steve Jobs introduced the Apple iPad and kicked off a sea change in how people gamed, browsed the Internet, and watched video. While the iPad and the Android tablets that shipped afterwards didn’t single-handedly wreck the PC market, they definitely played a role in the decline in total sales. Now, Tim Cook thinks the iPad Pro could hammer the corporate PC the same way that the original iPad cannibalized mainstream PC sales. In an interview with The…

Technology

iPad Pro review

Yesterday, we covered Tim Cook’s claim that the iPad Pro could easily replace laptops, to the point that most people wouldn’t even need a computer. Early reviews of the iPad Pro are in, and while they point to a very strong device, they don’t entirely affirm Cook’s views. First, let’s hit the high points. Everyone agrees that this is a very big, very sexy iPad. It’s light, it’s well-built, the screen is gorgeous, and it’s fast. Ars Technica’s benchmarks show…